Learn agent-based modeling with Bill Rand

Agent-based modeling has been used to study everything from economics to biology to political science to business and management. This July, programmers and non-programmers alike can learn to model by enrolling in Introduction to Agent-based Modeling, Complexity Explorer’s massive open online course (MOOC).

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SFI Community Lecture - The Nature of Time

On June 19 at The Lensic Performing Arts Center, a panel of scientists will discuss the latest scientific understanding of time, and how time shapes our experience of life and mortality. The panel will be moderated by science writer Jennifer Ouellette, former editor of Gizmodo.

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The water wheel of socio-hydro systems

This week at SFI, scientists from fields ranging from hydrology and environmental engineering to political science and economics explore the interplay of environmental conditions and society around water.

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Social learning squared

A workshop, Integrating different perspectives on social learning, meets to share insights from a range of disciplines.

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Video: Damon Centola on 'How behavior spreads'

Damon Centola presents more than a decade of original research examining how changes in societal behavior ― in voting, health, technology, and finance ― occur and the ways social networks can be used to influence how they propagate. Watch the talk. (1 hour 22 minutes)

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Complexity postdocs reconvene

The Santa Fe Institute and James S. McDonnell Foundation (JSMF) are reconvening their postdoctoral fellows for the third bi-annual Postdocs in Complexity Conference on March 27-30 in Santa Fe.

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Video: Chris Kempes on Life on Earth and Beyond

Though scientists have yet to find life beyond our own planet, the universe is rife with possibilities. Where to look, and how to recognize it when we find it, are questions physical biologist Chris Kempes explored during March 20 Santa Fe Institute Community Lecture. Watch his talk here.

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Opening a centuries-old window on innovation

Patents are one of the best sources of data on technology development — an open-ended, historical and adaptive system that shows us how and why inventions have come to be. But is the U.S. patent system broken?

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