Santa Fe Institute

Wild and Domesticated Religions: How the Machinery of Religion Evolved

Community Event

March 16, 2010
7:30 PM
James A. Little Theater

Daniel Dennett, University Professor and Austin B. Fletcher Professor of Philosophy, Tufts University, Center for Cognitive Studies; Inaugural Miller Scholar, Santa Fe Institute

Religions have probably changed more in the last two centuries than they changed in the last two millennia, and perhaps they will change more in the next twenty years than they have in the last two centuries. Dennett discusses religions as intricately designed cultural survivors. He examines how and why their parts work together as they do and explores how we can respond thoughtfully to the challenges they currently suggest.

The lecture is generously underwritten by Los Alamos National Bank and by Joy and Phil LeCuyer.

More Info

  • * SFI community lectures are free, open, & accessible to the public.
  • * Other SFI events are by invitation only.

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