Santa Fe Institute

External Faculty

The goal of the SFI external faculty is to provide the best research ecosystem for the trans-disciplinary and complexity science goals of SFI.

All appointments to the SFI external faculty are by nomination only. Prior to appointment to external faculty one or more years of active involvement with the institute are required. Typically researchers that have not been to SFI are invited by a member of our faculty (resident or external) based on admiration of their work or through some form of ongoing collaboration.

Browse the SFI Phone and Email Directory.

W. Brian Arthur

External Professor

Palo Alto Research Center (PARC), Intelligent Systems Lab

Sander (F.A.) Bais

External Professor

Professor, University of Amsterdam, Institute for Theoretical Physics

Mahzarin Banaji

External Professor

Richard Clarke Cabot Professor of Social Ethics, Harvard University, Psychology

Jenna Bednar

External Professor

Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies, University of Michigan, Department of Political Science

Aviv Bergman

External Professor

Professor and Chair, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Department of Systems & Computational Biology, Department of Pathology, Dominick P. Purpura Departme

Lawrence Blume

External Professor

Goldwin Smith Professor of Economics, Professor of Information Science, Cornell University, Economics and Information Science

Elhanan Borenstein

External Professor

Assistant Professor, University of Washington, Department of Genome Sciences

Robert Boyd

External Professor

Professor, Arizona State University, School of Human Evolution and Social Change

Elizabeth Bradley

Science Board, External Professor

Professor, University of Colorado, Department of Computer Science and Electrical and Computer Engineering

Timothy G. Buchman

External Professor, Ph.D., M.D.

Founding Director, Emory Center for Critical Care, and Professor of Surgery, Emory University School of Medicine, Department of Surgery, and Emory Center for Critical Care

Carlos Castillo-Chavez

External Professor

ASU Regents Professor and Joaquin Bustoz Jr. Professor of Mathematical Biology, Arizona State University, Mathematical and Statistical Sciences

Aaron Clauset

External Professor

Assistant Professor, University of Colorado, Boulder, Department of Computer Science and Biofrontiers Institute

Fred Cooper

External Professor

Los Alamos National Laboratory

James P. Crutchfield

External Professor

Director, Complexity Sciences Center, Professor of Physics, University of California, Davis

Raissa D'Souza

External Professor

Professor, University of California, Davis, Department of Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering

Rob de Boer

External Professor

Professor, Utrecht University, Theoretical Biology & Bioinformatics

Simon DeDeo

External Professor

Assistant Professor, Indiana University, School of Informatics and Computing

Eric Deeds

External Professor

Assistant Professor, University of Kansas, Department of Molecular Biosciences

Katherine Demuth

External Professor

Director, Child Language Lab, Macquarie University, Linguistics/ Centre for Language Sciences

Daniel Dennett

External Professor

University Professor and Austin B. Fletcher Professor of Philosophy, Tufts University, Center for Cognitive Studies

Andrew Dobson

External Professor

Professor, Princeton University, Ecology & Evolutionary Biology

Santiago F. Elena

External Professor

CSIC Professor, Instituto de Biología Molecular y Celular de Plantas, Evolutionary Systems Virology Group

Brian Enquist

External Professor

Associate Professor, University of Arizona, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Joshua M. Epstein

External Professor

Prof. of Emergency Medicine, Director, Center for Advanced Modeling in Social, Behav and Health Sci, Johns Hopkins University, Economics, Biostatistics, and Environmental Health Sciences

Douglas H. Erwin

External Professor

Senior Scientist and Curator of Paleobiology, Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, Paleobiology

J. Doyne Farmer

External Professor

Professor of Mathematics, University of Oxford, INET@Oxford

Nina Fedoroff

Science Board, External Professor

Evan Pugh Professor; Distinguished Visiting Professor, Penn State University; King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Huck Institutes of the Life Sciences

Marc Feldman

Science Board, External Professor

Wohlford Professor, Stanford University, Biological Sciences

Walter Fontana

External Professor, Science Steering Committee

Professor of Systems Biology, Harvard Medical School, Systems Biology

Stephanie Forrest

External Professor

Distinguished Regents Professor of Computer Science, University of New Mexico, Computer Science

Laura Fortunato

External Professor

Associate Professor of Evolutionary Anthropology, University of Oxford and Tutorial Fellow in Evolutionary Anthropology at Magdalen College, University of Oxford, University of Oxford


Listen to Laura discuss the evolution of the human family

Steven A. Frank

External Professor

Professor, University of California, Irvine, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Miguel Fuentes

External Professor

Researcher, CONICET

John Geanakoplos

Science Board, External Professor

James Tobin Professor of Economics, Yale University, Economics

Herbert Gintis

External Professor

Professor, Central European University, Economics,Emeritus Professor, University of Massachusetts, Economics

Michelle Girvan

External Professor

Assistant Professor, University of Maryland, Department of Physics

Amos Golan

External Professor

Professor, Department of Economics, American University; Director, Info-Metrics Institute

Jessica Green

External Professor

Associate Professor, University of Oregon Eugene, Center for Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

George Gumerman

External Professor

School for Advanced Research, Archeology and Anthropology

Peter Hammerstein

External Professor

Professor, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Institute for Theoretical Biology

Ross Hammond

External Professor

Senior fellow in Economic Studies, and Director, Center on Social Dynamics and Policy, Brookings Institution, Economics Studies

John Harte

External Professor

Professor, University of California, Berkeley, Environmental Science, Policy and Management

James Hartle

External Professor

Research Professor and Professor of Physics Emeritus, University of California, Santa Barbara

Ricardo Hausmann

External Professor

Director of Harvard's Center for International Development, Harvard University

Michael Hochberg

External Professor

Distinguished Research Director, Université Montpellier II, Institut des Sciences de l'Evolution (CNRS - UMR 5554)

Alfred Hübler

External Professor

Director, Center for Complex Systems Research and Professor, Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Matthew O. Jackson

External Professor

William D. Eberle Professor of Economics, Stanford University, Economics

Sanjay Jain

External Professor

Professor, University of Delhi, Department of Physics and Astrophysics

Erica Jen

Science Board, External Professor

Mark Johnson

External Professor

Director for the Centre for Language Sciences, Macquarie Universtiy, Department of Computing

Jürgen Jost

External Professor

Director, Max Planck Institute for Mathematics in the Sciences

Sabre Kais

External Professor

Professor, Purdue University and QEERI, Qatar, Department of Chemistry

Helmut Katzgraber

External Professor

Associate Professor, Texas A & M University, Physics and Astronomy

Tim Kohler

Science Board, External Professor

Regents Professor, Washington State University, Anthropology

J. Stephen Lansing

External Professor

Director, Nanyang Technological University, Complexity Institute

Manfred Laubichler

External Professor

President's Professor, Director, Center for Social Dynamics and Complexity, Arizona State University, School of Life Sciences and Center for Biology and Society

Fabrizio Lillo

External Professor

Professor of Quantitative Finance, Universita Degli Studi De Palermo, Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa

Marc Lipsitch

External Professor

Director, Center for Communicable Disease Dynamics, Harvard School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology

Seth Lloyd

Science Board, External Professor

Professor, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

Jonathan Machta

External Professor

Professor, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Physics

Pablo Marquet

External Professor

Professor, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Ecology

Patricia McAnany

External Professor

Kenan Eminent Professor, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, Department of Anthropology

Stephan Mertens

External Professor

Professor, Otto-von-Guericke Universität Magdeburg, Institute Für Theoretische Physik

Lauren Meyers

Science Board, External Professor

Professor and Director, University of Texas at Austin, Section of Integrative Biology and Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology

John H. Miller

Chair, Science Steering Committee, External Professor

Professor of Economics and Social Science, Carnegie Mellon University

Melanie Mitchell

Science Board, External Professor

Professor, Portland State University, Computer Science

Melanie Moses

External Professor

University of New Mexico, Department of Computer Science

Mark Newman

External Professor

Paul Dirac Collegiate Professor of Physics, University of Michigan, Physics and Complex Systems

Kazuo Nishimura

External Professor

Professor, Kyoto University, Institute of Economic Research, Kyoto University

Henrik Olsson

External Professor

Associate Professor, University of Warwick, Department of Psychology

Scott Ortman

External Professor

Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Univeristy of Colorado, Boulder


Scott Orman asks what determines the course of human history

John Padgett

External Professor

Professor, University of Chicago, Political Science

Scott Page

External Professor

Leonid Hurwicz Collegiate Professor and Director, Center for the Study of Complex Systems, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Political Science and Center for the Study of Complex Systems

Robert E. Page, Jr.

External Professor

Foundation Chair of Life Sciences and University Provost Emeritus, Arizona State University; Professor Emeritus from the University of California, Davis

Mark Pagel

Science Board, External Professor

Professor, Reading University, School of Biological Sciences

Mercedes Pascual

Science Board co-chair, Science Steering Committee, External Faculty

Professor, University of Chicago, Department of Ecology and Evolution

John Pepper

External Professor

Biologist, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Prevention

Peter Peregrine

External Professor

Professor of Anthropology, Lawrence University

Alan Perelson

Science Board, External Professor

Senior Fellow, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mathematical and Theoretical Biology

Juan Perez-Mercader

External Professor

Senior Research Fellow and Principal Investigator, Harvard University, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences

Ole Peters

External Professor

London Mathematical Laboratory

Thomas "Zack" Powell

External Professor

Professor Emeritus, University of California, Berkeley, Department of Integrative Biology

Steen Rasmussen

External Professor

Professor, Research Director and Center Leader, University of Southern Denmark, Self Organizing Systems

Dan Rockmore

External Professor, Science Steering Committee

Professor, Dartmouth College, Mathematics and Computer Science

John Rundle

External Professor

Distinguished Professor of Physics and Geology, University of California, Davis, Earth and Planetary Sciences

Jeremy (Jerry) A. Sabloff

External Professor and Past President, Santa Fe Institute

Paula L.W. Sabloff

External Professor, Santa Fe Institute

Van P. Savage

External Professor

Associate Professor, Department of Biomathematics and the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, UCLA School of Medicine

Hans Joachim (John) Schellnhuber

External Professor

Director, Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research

Peter Schuster

External Professor Emeritus

Professor emeritus, University of Vienna, Theoretical Chemistry

Rajiv Sethi

External Professor

Ann Whitney Olin Professor of Economics, Barnard College, Columbia University, Dept. of Economics

Cosma Shalizi

External Professor

Assistant Professor, Carnegie Mellon University, Statistics Department

David Sherrington

External Professor

University of Oxford, Condensed Matter Theory Group; The Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics

Martin Shubik

External Professor Emeritus

Seymour Knox Professor of Mathematical Institutional Economics, Yale University, Economics

D. Eric Smith

External Professor

Research Professor, Earth-Life Science Institute, Tokyo Institute of Technology

Bruce Smith

External Professor

Curator, North American Archaeology, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution

Ricard Solé

External Professor

ICREA-Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Life Sciences

Peter Stadler

External Professor

Professor, University of Leipzig, Dept. of Computer Science & Interdisciplinary Center of Bioinformatics

Charles Stanish

External Professor, Science Steering Committee

Professor and Director, University of California, Los Angeles, Anthropology, Cotsen Institute of Archeology

Charles Stevens

External Professor, Science Board

Professor and Vincent J. Coates Chair in Molecular Neurobiology, The Salk Institute, Molecular Neurobiology Laboratory

Stefan Thurner

External Professor

Head, Section for Science of Complex Systems, Medical University of Vienna

Jessika Trancik

External Professor, Science Steering Committee

Atlantic Richfield Career Development Assistant Professor in Energy Studies, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Engineering Systems Division

Constantino Tsallis

External Professor

Brazilian Center for Physics Research and National Institute of Science and Tech

Sander van der Leeuw

External Professor

Foundation Professor, Arizona State University, School of Sustainability and Schoolof Human Evolution and Social Change

Andreas Wagner

Science Board, External Professor

Professor, University of Zurich, Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environ. Studies

Douglas R. White

External Professor

Professor Emeritus, Anthropology, University of California-Irvine, Institute of Mathematical Behavioral Science

Jon Wilkins

External Professor

Ronin Institute

Chris Wood

External Professor

Elisabeth Jean Wood

External Professor

Professor, Yale University, Political Science

William (Woody) Woodruff

External Professor

Laboratory Fellow, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Chemistry Division

Henry T. Wright

External Professor

Albert C. Spaulding Distinguished University Professor of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology

Melinda A. Zeder

External Professor

Senior Research Scientist and Curator of Old World Archaeology, Department of Anthropology, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution

W. Brian Arthur

External Professor

Palo Alto Research Center (PARC), Intelligent Systems Lab

W. Brian Arthur is an External Faculty Member at the Santa Fe Institute, IBM Faculty Fellow, and Visiting Researcher in the Intelligent Systems Lab at PARC (formerly Xerox Parc). From 1983 to 1996 he was Morrison Professor of Economics and Population Studies at Stanford University. He holds a Ph.D. from Berkeley in Operations Research, and has other degrees in economics, engineering and mathematics.
Arthur pioneered the modern study of positive feedbacks or increasing returns in the economy--in particular their role in magnifying small, random events in the economy. This work has gone on to become the basis of our understanding of the high-tech economy. He has recently published a new book: The Nature of Technology: What it Is and How it Evolves, "an elegant and powerful theory of technology's origins and evolution."He is also one of the pioneers of the science of complexity.
Arthur was the first ...

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Sander (F.A.) Bais

External Professor

Professor, University of Amsterdam, Institute for Theoretical Physics

I have performed research on a broad spectrum of problems in theoretical physics. My focus has been on applications of quantum field theory in fields like high energy physics, condensed matter theory and the physics of the early universe. In particular I have been concerned with topological aspects of nonlinear systems, i.e. topological excitations like non abeleian vortices, domain walls, monopoles, skyrmions and instantons and their moduli spaces. I did pioneering research two dimensional systems which exhibit topological order leading to the existence of anyons which are particle like collective excitations which exhibit very exotic spin and braid statistics properties. These anyons allow for an implementation of quantum computation that is intrinsically decoherence free. This approach also allows new answers to conceptual questions about key systems like two dimensional quantum gravity and duality in supersymetric gauge theories. I wrote some popular books on science that have been translated in ...

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Mahzarin Banaji

Richard Clarke Cabot Professor of Social Ethics at Harvard, received her PhD from Ohio State University in 1986 and was a National Institutes of Health postdoctoral fellow at the University of Washington in Seattle. She is an experimental psychologist who studies human thinking and feeling as it unfolds in social contexts. She is interested in the sub-conscious nature of assessments of self and other human beings that reflect feelings and knowledge about social group membership. She brings a cognitive science and psychology perspective to existing SFI programs related to behavior and decision-making.

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Jenna Bednar

External Professor

Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies, University of Michigan, Department of Political Science

Professor Bednar's research is on the analysis of institutions, focusing on the theoretical underpinnings of the stability of federal states. Her models seek to answer questions such as: Why does the federal government take advantage of state governments? Why are some federations stable, despite frequent episodes of intergovernmental tension? and Can the court effectively referee federalism disputes if it makes mistakes or is biased in favor of one goverment? She is also interested in constitutions: specifically, the potential that constitutional design has to affect the behavior of heterogeneous populations with decentralized governmental structures.

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Aviv Bergman

External Professor

Professor and Chair, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Department of Systems & Computational Biology, Department of Pathology, Dominick P. Purpura Departme

My research agenda addresses quantitative problems in evolutionary and developmental biology by using a combination of computational, mathematical and experimental tools. Starting with biologically relevant models, we comb for data from existing studies, and in close collaboration with experimentalists, we generate new data. In turn, this data allows us to refine the models, thus guiding both experimental and modeling processes. The ability to test models in this way is facilitated by data generated from systematic genomics efforts undertaken in recent years. Central to my approach is an evolutionary perspective in examining the hypotheses arising from the combination of theoretical model and biological data.

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Lawrence Blume

External Professor

Goldwin Smith Professor of Economics, Professor of Information Science, Cornell University, Economics and Information Science


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Elhanan Borenstein

External Professor

Assistant Professor, University of Washington, Department of Genome Sciences

My research interests lie in the interplay between evolutionary processes and the organization of biological, ecological and social systems.  My goal is to identify fundamental, universal, and generic links between the structure of complex systems and their generative dynamics, and to develop methods to draw novel insights from these links.

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Robert Boyd

A longtime SFI External Professor—as well as Origins Professor at Arizona State University's School of Human Evolution and Social Change—Rob received his PhD in ecology at UC Davis. He has taught at Duke and Emory universities. Much of his research focuses on population and dynamic models of culture, and he has published on the evolution of social behavior, especially reciprocity and collective action. He brings a game theory and dynamics approach to questions of cultural evolution.

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Elizabeth Bradley

Science Board, External Professor

Professor, University of Colorado, Department of Computer Science and Electrical and Computer Engineering

Liz Bradley did her undergraduate and graduate work at MIT, interrupted by a one-year leave of absence to row in the 1988 Olympic Games, and has been with the Department of Computer Science at the University of Colorado at Boulder since January of 1993. Her research interests include nonlinear dynamics, artificial intelligence, and control theory. She is the recipient of a NSF National Young Investigator award, a Packard Fellowship, a Radcliffe Fellowship, and the 1999 student-voted University of Colorado College of Engineering teaching award.

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Timothy G. Buchman

External Professor, Ph.D., M.D.

Founding Director, Emory Center for Critical Care, and Professor of Surgery, Emory University School of Medicine, Department of Surgery, and Emory Center for Critical Care

Professor of Surgery, Department of Surgery, Emory University School of Medicine

Founding Director, Emory Center for Critical Care, Woodruff Health Sciences Center, Emory University

Dr. Buchman is the founding director of the Emory Center for Critical Care (ECCC). The ECCC recently became Emory's newest comprehensive center of excellence, integrating ICUs throughout the Emory Healthcare system, bringing together clinicians and investigators from diverse disciplines to conduct research to define best clinical practices and inform public health policy. The center also houses Emory's training programs in critical care anesthesiology, surgical critical care, and pulmonary/medical critical care. Dr. Buchman is a past president of the Society of Critical Care Medicine, the largest organization of critical care professionals worldwide. He currently is president of the Society for Complexity in Acute Illness and is deputy editor of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons. His research spans the bench-to-bedside continuum, including ...

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Carlos Castillo-Chavez

External Professor

ASU Regents Professor and Joaquin Bustoz Jr. Professor of Mathematical Biology, Arizona State University, Mathematical and Statistical Sciences

Carlos Castillo-Chavez is a Regents and a Joaquin Bustoz Jr. Professor at Arizona State University. Carlos Castillo-Chavez' research program is carried out at the interface of the mathematical and natural and social sciences and puts emphasis on (i) the role of dynamic social landscapes on disease dispersal; (ii) the role of behavior on disease evolution, (iii) the role of behavior, environmental and social structures on the dynamics of addiction, (iv) the identification of mechanisms that facilitate the spread of diseases across multiple levels of organization.

 On July 1st, 2008, Carlos Castillo-Chavez became the founding director of the Mathematical, Computational and Modeling Sciences Center as well as the founding director of the graduate field in applied mathematics in the life and social sciences or AMLSS at ASU and the founder and director of the undergraduate bachelor of sciences degree in applied mathematics in the life and social sciences. Castillo-Chavez is ...

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Aaron Clauset

External Professor

Assistant Professor, University of Colorado, Boulder, Department of Computer Science and Biofrontiers Institute

Aaron's research spans several areas of the study of complex systems. His primary work focuses on the development of statistical models of, and data-analysis methods for, complex networks in the social, biological and technological fields. Much of this work has been methodological and brings together tools from computer science, physics and statistics. His current work focuses on generative models for the large-scale structure of networks, e.g., the hierarchical organization of modular organization, and the development of a mathematically principled methods for testing network hypotheses. Aaron also works on statistical models and empirical studies of violent conflicts like terrorism, and models of macroevolution. In general, he is motivated by interdisciplinary questions regarding the use of stochastic mechanisms to generate, and maintain, non-trivial "complex" or ubiquitous empirical patterns.

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Fred Cooper

External Professor

Los Alamos National Laboratory

Fred Cooper is currently working on understanding pattern development in noisy reaction diffusion equations using non-equilibrium quantum field theory methods. His fields of expertise are in non-equilibrium and non-perturbative quantum field theory as well nonlinear systems and soliton dynamics and the application of field theory methods to both classical and quantum dynamical systems. He is also studying the dynamics of phase transitions in multicomponent Bose-Einstein condensates.

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James P. Crutchfield

External Professor

Director, Complexity Sciences Center, Professor of Physics, University of California, Davis

Jim Crutchfield is a Professor of Physics at the University of California, Davis, where he directs a new research and graduate program at the Complexity Sciences Center. Prior to this he was Research Professor at the Santa Fe Institute for many years, where he directed the Dynamics of Learning Group and SFI’s Network Dynamics Program. Before coming to SFI in 1997, he was a Research Physicist in the Physics Department at the University of California, Berkeley, since 1985. He has been a Visiting Research Professor at the Sloan Center for Theoretical Neurobiology, Uni- versity of California, San Francisco; a Post-doctoral Fellow of the Miller Institute for Basic Research in Science at UCB; a UCB Physics Department IBM Post-Doctoral Fellow in Condensed Matter Physics; a Distinguished Visiting Research Professor of the Beckman Institute at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; and a Bernard Osher Fellow at the San Francisco Exploratorium. He ...

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Raissa D'Souza

External Professor

Professor, University of California, Davis, Department of Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering

Raissa D’Souza is Professor of Computer Science and  Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at the University of California, Davis, as well as an External Professor at the Santa Fe Institute. Her research focuses on mathematical models of self-organization, phase transitions, and the structure and function of networked systems. Her publications span the fields of statistical physics, theoretical computer science and applied math, and appear in journals such as Science, PNAS, Nature Physics, and Physical Review Letters. Raissa received a PhD in Statistical Physics from MIT in 1999, then was a postdoctoral fellow at Bell Laboratories, and later at Microsoft Research. She currently serves on the editorial board of several international mathematics and physics journals and is a member of the World Economic Forum's Global Agenda Council on Complex Systems. When not pursuing research ideas, she can typically be found outside, either scaling rocks or sailing.

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Rob de Boer

External Professor

Professor, Utrecht University, Theoretical Biology & Bioinformatics

Rob J. de Boer is a Professor of Theoretical Immunology at Utrecht University since 2004. He was born in Amsterdam, 1958. He studied Biology in Utrecht, and did his PhD in Theoretical Immunology with Paulien Hogeweg at Utrecht University in 1989. After his PhD he did a postdoc with Alan Perelson at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, with whom he continued to collaborate. In 1991 he returned to Utrecht University as a staff member Theoretical Biology. Scientifically he is mainly active in the field of Theoretical Immunology, investigating population dynamics and host-pathogen evolution in the immune system using mathematical models, computer simulation models, and bioinformatics. He is the author of more than 130 publications, of which about 25 have been cited at least 25 times, winner of the prestigious NWO Vici award for research in Theoretical Immunology (2004), editor of several international journals, member of the external faculty of the ...

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Simon DeDeo

Omidyar Fellow, 2009-2012

As a Research Fellow at SFI, Simon DeDeo works on questions of computation in the natural world: how things that evolved — in contrast to things humans built — process information.

Drawing on his training in the mathematical sciences, he takes advantage of SFI's transdisciplinary environment to investigate the emergence of collective phenomena in biological and social systems. In many cases, these allow groups to solve problems better than any of their individual parts. At SFI he combines methods developed to study, on the one hand, "unintelligent" physical phenomena, and on the other hand, engineered systems, to study evolved and adaptive phenomena in the living world. He works in collaboration with researchers in fields ranging from neuroscience to animal behavior to human social systems.

Simon holds an A.B. in astrophysics from Harvard, a Master’s in applied mathematics and theoretical physics from Cambridge University, and a Ph.D. in astrophysical sciences from Princeton University. His recent past includes post doctoral fellowships at the Institute for Physics and Mathematics of the Universe at the University of Tokyo and at the Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics at the University of Chicago.

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Eric Deeds

External Professor

Assistant Professor, University of Kansas, Department of Molecular Biosciences

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Katherine Demuth

External Professor

Director, Child Language Lab, Macquarie University, Linguistics/ Centre for Language Sciences

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 I grew up in northern New Mexico, with strong interests in the peoples, cultures, and languages of the region.  This was nurtured by studying Anthropology at UNM. However, my study of Spanish led me to Mexico and then South America, where I finally came to realize that my true passion was linguistics, and the study of how language is learned. The pursuit of my research questions eventually led me to southern Africa, where I carried out a longitudinal study of children’s language development for several years. This lead to a career in developmental psycholinguistics.

My research has come to focus on how children construct a grammar from what they hear around them. This has lead me to conduct comparative/crosslinguistic studies where it is possible ...

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Daniel Dennett

External Professor

University Professor and Austin B. Fletcher Professor of Philosophy, Tufts University, Center for Cognitive Studies

Daniel C. Dennett, the author of Breaking the Spell (Viking, 2006), Freedom Evolves (Viking Penguin, 2003) and Darwin's Dangerous Idea (Simon &Schuster, 1995), is University Professor and Austin B. Fletcher Professor of Philosophy, and Co-Director of the Center for Cognitive Studies at Tufts University. He lives with his wife in North Andover, Massachusetts, and has a daughter, a son, and three grandchildren. He was born in Boston in 1942, the son of a historian by the same name, and received his B.A. in philosophy from Harvard in 1963. He then went to Oxford to work with Gilbert Ryle, under whose supervision he completed the D.Phil. in philosophy in 1965. He taught at U.C. Irvine from 1965 to 1971, when he moved to Tufts, where he has taught ever since, aside from periods visiting at Harvard, Pittsburgh, Oxford, and the École Normale Supérieure in Paris.

His first ...

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Andrew Dobson

External Professor

Professor, Princeton University, Ecology & Evolutionary Biology

Parasitic worms, bacteria and viruses are a constant feature of the daily lives of most 'healthy' populations of animal and plant species. My research is concerned with the population ecology of infectious diseases and the conservation of endangered and threatened species. Over the last eight years I have studied infectious diseases in a variety of endangered and fragile ecosystems. Each study has allowed me to develop sections of a larger body of theory that deals with the role of infectious diseases in wild animal populations. The role that infectious diseases play in driving populations to extinction is one of the key unsolved problems of conservation biology. Although ecologists now realize that pathogens and parasites play a key role in regulating population numbers, infectious diseases often cause rapid declines in the abundance of threatened species and continue to plague captive breeding programs. In particular, I have been studying rinderpest in Ngorongoro ...

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Santiago F. Elena

External Professor

CSIC Professor, Instituto de Biología Molecular y Celular de Plantas, Evolutionary Systems Virology Group

In general, my scientific interests are related with the evolutionary biology of microbes. More concretely, this interest is focused in the study, within the framework of Populations Genetics, of the mechanisms that generate and maintain the genetic variability of RNA viruses. The model systems that we use now for our experiments are the RNA viruses Tobacco etch potyvirus (TEV) and Turnip mosaic potyvirus (TuMV), the para-retrovirus Cauliflower mosaic caulimovirus (CaMV), and the viroids. I have also been exploring the endless potential of digital organisms as model systems for evolutionary studies. And finally, to avoid missing the wave of “Systems Biology” we are now developing in silico and mathematical hierarchical models of the entire viral infectious cycle.

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Brian Enquist

External Professor

Associate Professor, University of Arizona, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Dr. Enquist is a broadly trained plant ecologist. His lab investigates how functional and physical constraints at the level of the individual (anatomical and physiological) influence larger scale ecological and evolutionary patterns. In particular, the lab focuses on two core areas: (1) highlighting and deducing general principles, scaling rules, and the physical constraints influencing the evolution of organismal form, function, and diversity; and (2) understanding the larger scale ramifications (ecological, evolutionary, and ecosystem) of these rules/constraints. In order to address these critical issues the lab uses both theoretical, computational, biophysical and physiological and ecophysiological approaches. Research in the lab can be summarized into four distinct yet interrelated areas: (i) The evolution of form and functional diversity; (ii) The origin of allometric relationships (how characteristics of organisms change with their size) and the scaling of biological processes from cells to ecosystems. (iii) The evolution of life-history and allocation strategies; (iv ...

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Joshua M. Epstein

External Professor

Prof. of Emergency Medicine, Director, Center for Advanced Modeling in Social, Behav and Health Sci, Johns Hopkins University, Economics, Biostatistics, and Environmental Health Sciences

A pioneer in agent-based computational modeling, Josh Epstein has recently done groundbreaking work on epidemics and bioterrorism. He has published widely in the modeling area, including articles on the dynamics of civil violence, the demography of the Anasazi, the evolution of norms, and the epidemiology of smallpox and pandemic flu.

Epstein also serves as an External Professor at the Santa Fe Institute and a member of the New York Academy of Sciences and is a former Senior Fellow in Economics and Director of the center of Social and Economic Dynamics at the Brookings Institution.He is a recipient of the prestigious 2008 NIH Director’s Pioneer Award, lead investigator in Modeling and Simulation for the DHS University Center of Excellence on Preparedness and Catastrophic Event Response (PACER) at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, and director of Global Epidemic Modeling for the National Institutes of Health's Models of Infectious ...

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Douglas H. Erwin

External Professor

Senior Scientist and Curator of Paleobiology, Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, Paleobiology

Doug Erwin is a Senior Scientist and Curator of Paleobiology at the National Museum of Natural History of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington D. C., as well as a part-time Resident Faculty member of SFI. His research involves a variety of aspects of the history of life and evolution, including ecological and developmental aspects of the origin of animals, the causes and consequences of the great end-Permian mass extinction some 252 million years ago, and the evolutionary history of really old snails. His latest project is a book on evolutionary innovation through the history of life, which will also explore the similarities and differences between economic and biological innovation. Various field projects have taken Doug repeatedly to China, South Africa and Namibia, and he has done geological field work in various other regions as well.

Erwin received an A.B. from Colgate University in 1980 and a Ph. D from ...

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J. Doyne Farmer

External Professor

Professor of Mathematics, University of Oxford, INET@Oxford

J. Doyne Farmer is an external professor at the Santa Fe Institute. He has broad interests in complex systems, and has done research in dynamical systems theory, time series analysis and theoretical biology. At present his main interest is in developing quantitative theories for social evolution, in particular for financial markets (which provide an accurate record of decision making in a complex environment) and the evolution of new technologies (whose performance through time provides a quantitative record of human achievement). He was a founder of Prediction Company, a quantitative trading firm that was recently sold to the United Bank of Switzerland, and was their chief scientist from 1991 - 1999. During the eighties he worked at Los Alamos National Laboratory, where he was an Oppenheimer Fellow, founding the Complex Systems Group in the theoretical division. He began his career as part of the U.C. Santa Cruz Dynamical Systems Collective, a ...

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Nina Fedoroff

Science Board, External Professor

Evan Pugh Professor; Distinguished Visiting Professor, Penn State University; King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Huck Institutes of the Life Sciences

Nina Fedoroff did her undergraduate work at Syracuse University, graduating summa cum laude with a dual major in biology and chemistry. She attended the Rockefeller University, where she earned her Ph.D. in Molecular Biology in 1972. Both her undergraduate research at Syracuse University and her graduate research on RNA bacteriophage at The Rockefeller University were supported by grants and fellowships from the National Science Foundation. Following graduation from The Rockefeller University, she joined the faculty at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), and carried out research on nuclear RNA. In 1974 Fedoroff received fellowships from the Damon Runyan-Walter Winchell Cancer Research Fund and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for postdoctoral work, first at UCLA and then in the Department of Embryology of the Carnegie Institution of Washington in Baltimore. Working in the laboratory of Donald Brown, Fedoroff pioneered in DNA sequencing, determining the nucleotide sequence of the ...

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Marc Feldman

Science Board, External Professor

Wohlford Professor, Stanford University, Biological Sciences

Marcus Feldman was born and raised in Perth, Australia, the son of Simon and Ida Feldman. Although both of his parents encouraged him to follow his own interests and passions, his father, an engineer, liked math and before long young Marcus had picked up the penchant. “He was happy that I did,” recalls Feldman.
It was anything but a passing fancy. At the University of Western Australia, Feldman first earned his bachelor of science degree in 1964, then just two years later, his master of science in mathematics from Monash University in Australia. From there, he ventured to the United States to get his doctorate in mathematical biology at Stanford University, after which he returned to Australia where he had accepted a teaching position at La Trobe University in Melbourne.
Two years later, however, Feldman was back in California, joining Stanford’s biology faculty in 1971. There, he began using ...

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Walter Fontana

External Professor, Science Steering Committee

Professor of Systems Biology, Harvard Medical School, Systems Biology

Trained as a chemist, mentored in theoretical molecular biology by Peter Schuster (Vienna), educated in evolutionary biology by Leo Buss (Yale), self-taught in computer science and charmed by the social sciences through John Padgett (Chicago), I have straddled many divides that are now coming together naturally. I have taken risks in pursuing a professional trajectory shaped by the desire for a broadly engaging cross-disciplinary environment more than by career safety. This led to my decision of resigning tenure at the University of Vienna (1994-1998) to join the Santa Fe Institute on a term-limited six year position (1998-2004).

I moved to Harvard Medical School in September 2004, attracted by a vision of systems biology that emphasized evolution and molecular physiology. A theoretician for 16 years, I was transformed by living for a while among molecular biologists and seeing the opportunities that quantitative thinking and technology bring to experimental biology. I started ...

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Stephanie Forrest

External Professor

Distinguished Regents Professor of Computer Science, University of New Mexico, Computer Science

Dr. Forrest is currently serving one year as Senior Science Advisor for the U. S. Department of State through August 2014.  Stephanie Forrest is Distinguished Regents Professor of Computer Science at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque and an External Professor and Science Board member at the Santa Fe Institute. Professor Forrest received her Ph.D. in Computer and Communication Sciences from the University of Michigan. Before joining UNM she worked for Teknowledge Inc. and was a Director's Fellow at the Center for Nonlinear Studies, Los Alamos National Laboratory. Professor Forrest is an external faculty member of the Santa Fe Institute and serves on its science board. She also served as SFI's Interim Vice President 1999-2000. Professor Forrest is a member of the Adaptive Computation Group at UNM, where she studies adaptive systems, including genetic algorithms, computational immunology, biological modeling, and computer security. She is also a ...

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Laura Fortunato

External Professor

Associate Professor of Evolutionary Anthropology, University of Oxford and Tutorial Fellow in Evolutionary Anthropology at Magdalen College, University of Oxford, University of Oxford

Laura's research aims to understand the evolution of human social and cultural behaviour, working at the interface of biology and anthropology. Three areas of ongoing research are the evolution of human family systems, the study of how culture changes over time, and the emergence of cooperation and complexity in human social systems.

Her work combines theoretical and statistical methods developed in biology with theory and data drawn from the historical and social sciences. She holds a Laurea in biological sciences from the University of Padova and an MRes and PhD in anthropology from University College London.

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Steven A. Frank

External Professor

Professor, University of California, Irvine, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

I develop mathematical, computational, and conceptual models to study complex phenotypes.

Earlier in my career, I focused on how evolutionary and genetic processes shape reproductive and behavioral traits. It was necessary at that time to treat as a black box many of the genetical and physiological details that determine phenotypes, and to focus in a general way on how natural selection influences phenotypes over very broad assumptions about underlying mechanisms. Some examples can be found in my summary below on past research.

My research has changed in the past few years, following the great changes in modern biology. It is now possible to see below the surface of complex phenotypes to the biochemical and genetical mechanisms that control those characters. I have continued to focus on complex phenotypes as I did earlier in my career, but now with particular emphasis on how the quantitative dynamics of genetical, biochemical, and cellular ...

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Miguel Fuentes

External Professor

Researcher, CONICET

Miguel Angel Fuentes studied Physics at Instituto Balseiro, Argentina. After his undergraduates obligations he visited and studied at places like the Intitut Non Lineaire de Nice, France, the Center for Non Linear Studies, at Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA, and as an Omidyar Fellow at Santa Fe Institute, USA.

Miguel Angel Fuentes seeks to understand the behavior of complex systems from a conceptual/fundamental point of view, focusing on anomalies that often are important ingredients for the appearance of new features. He is developing a research program that focuses on emergent phenomena and stochastic and nonlinear dynamics applied to the appearance of innovations in ecologically diversified environments.

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John Geanakoplos

Science Board, External Professor

James Tobin Professor of Economics, Yale University, Economics

John Geanakoplos (b. 1955) received his B.A. in Mathematics from Yale University in 1975 (summa cum laude), his M.A. in Mathematics and his Ph.D. in Economics under Kenneth Arrow from Harvard University in 1980. He started as an Assistant Professor in Economics at Yale University in 1980, becoming an Associate Professor in 1983, Professor in 1986, and the James Tobin Professor of Economics in 1994. He is currently the Director of the Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics. He was elected a fellow of the Econometric Society in 1990 and of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1999. He was awarded the Samuelson Prize in 1999 (for work on lifetime financial security), and was awarded the first Bodossaki Prize in economics in 1994. In 1990-1991 and again in 1999-2000 he directed the economics program at the Santa Fe Institute, where he remains an external professor ...

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Herbert Gintis

External Professor

Professor, Central European University, Economics,Emeritus Professor, University of Massachusetts, Economics

Herbert Gintis (Ph.D. in Economics, Harvard University, 1969) is External Professor, Santa Fe Institute, and Professor of Economics, Central European University. He and Professor Robert Boyd (Anthropology, UCLA) head a multidisciplinary research project that models such behaviors as empathy, reciprocity, insider/outsider behavior, vengefulness, and other observed human behaviors not well handled by the traditional model of the self-regarding agent. His web site, www-unix.oit.umass.edu/~gintis, contains pertinent information. Professor Gintis published Game Theory Evolving (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2000), and is coeditor, with Joe Henrich, Robert Boyd, Samuel Bowles, Colin Camerer, and Ernst Fehr, of Foundations of Human Sociality: Economic Experiments and Ethnographic Evidence from Fifteen Small-scale Societies (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004), and with Samuel Bowles, Robert Boyd and Ernst Fehr, Moral Sentiments and Material Interests: On the Foundations of Cooperation in Economic Life (Cambridge: MIT Press, 2005). He is currently completing a book with ...

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Michelle Girvan

External Professor

Assistant Professor, University of Maryland, Department of Physics

My research operates at the intersection of statistical physics, nonlinear dynamics, and computer science and has applications to social, biological, and technological systems. More specifically, my work focuses on complex networks and often falls within the fields of computational biology and sociophysics. While some of the work is purely theoretical, I have become increasingly involved in using empirical data to inform and validate mathematical models.

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Amos Golan

Golan received his BA and MS from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and his PhD degree from UC Berkeley (economics with concentrations in statistical physics and mathematical economics). His main research interest is information, primarily the study of how to reason and optimize under conditions of incomplete information and the interdisciplinary study of info-metrics, which is the science and practice of information processing. He focuses on developing information-theoretic inferential methods for solving problems and understanding complex systems across many disciplines;

Current Project

Golan’s current major project is a primer on the Foundations of Info-Metrics. In this book he takes an interdisciplinary approach that lays out the foundations of info-metrics across the disciplines together with applications in the social, natural, medical, engineering and complexity sciences. This primer presents a framework for inference with finite, noisy and incomplete information. It shows that this framework is universal across disciplines though the problems and the specifics are different. It shows where, and how, these different features that are special to particular disciplines do come in.

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Jessica Green

External Professor

Associate Professor, University of Oregon Eugene, Center for Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

I am an applied and theoretical ecologist interested in biological diversity and asking questions about patterns in the distribution and abundance of species. The overarching aim of my work is to understand the forces that organize heterogeneous ecological systems, and to apply this understanding to help inform conservation policy and management decisions. I use interdisciplinary approaches at the interface of microbiology, ecology, mathematics, informatics, and computer science. Current systems of study include soil microbial communities in marine, alpine and mediterranean systems. Specific attention has been directed to exploring patterns and principles that may be common to microbes, plants and animals.

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George Gumerman

External Professor

School for Advanced Research, Archeology and Anthropology

Dr. Gumerman is a Senior Scholar at the School of American Research, prior to which he served as interim President and CEO of the School. From 2002 to 2004 he was the Vice President for Academic Affairs at the Santa Fe Institute. From1997 until 2002, he was the Director of the Arizona State Museum and a Professor of Anthropology at the University of Arizona in Tucson. After receiving his Ph.D. at the University of Arizona in 1969, Dr. Gumerman spent more than thirty years researching the archaeology of the Southwestern United States and Oceania. Early in his career he was the Curator of Anthropology at the Museum of Northern Arizona. He taught at Prescott College and at Southern Illinois University, where he was Chairman of the Anthropology Department and Founding Director of the Center for Archaeological Investigations. Dr. Gumerman was a Resident Scholar at the School of American Research ...

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Peter Hammerstein

External Professor

Professor, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Institute for Theoretical Biology


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Ross Hammond

External Professor

Senior fellow in Economic Studies, and Director, Center on Social Dynamics and Policy, Brookings Institution, Economics Studies

Ross A. Hammond is a senior fellow in Economic Studies at the Brookings Institution, where he is director of the Center on Social Dynamics and Policy. His primary area of expertise is modeling complex dynamics in economic, social, and public health systems using mathematical and computational methods from complexity systems science. His current research topics include obesity etiology and prevention, food systems, tobacco control, behavioral epidemiology, crime, corruption, segregation, trust, and decision-making.

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John Harte

External Professor

Professor, University of California, Berkeley, Environmental Science, Policy and Management

My areas of research include causes and consequences of climate change with an emphasis on the study of climate-ecosystem feedback processes, theoretical ecology with an emphasis on elucidating relationships between community structure and functional integrity of ecosystems, causes and consequences of declining biodiversity, biogeochemical processes and their disruption, and the role of ecological integrity in human society.

Current Projects

The major project now underway is a study of ecosystem responses to climate change. At the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory in Colorado, my students and I are artificially warming a large area of a subalpine meadow with overhead electric heaters. We monitor changes in soil microclimate, vegetation phenology and community composition,arthropod diversity, carbon dioxide and methane exchange with the atmosphere, nitrogen cycling, and nutrient status of the soils and plants. Results to date indicate that a level of warming comparable to that expected from a doubling of atmospheric carbon dioxide ...

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James Hartle

External Professor

Research Professor and Professor of Physics Emeritus, University of California, Santa Barbara

James B. Hartle is Research Professor and Professor of Physics Emeritus at the University of California, Santa Barbara. His scientific work is concerned with the application of Einstein's relativistic theory of gravitation --- general relativity --- to realistic astrophysical situations, especially cosmology. He has contributed usefully to the understanding of gravitational waves, relativistic stars, black holes, and the theory of the wave function of the universe. He is currently interested in the earliest moments of the big bang where the subjects of quantum mechanics, quantum gravity, and cosmology overlap. Much of his recent work is concerned with the generalizations of usual quantum mechanics that are necessary for cosmology and quantum gravity. He is a member of the US National Academy of Sciences, a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and is a founder and past director of the Institute for Theoretical Physics at Santa Barbara.

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Ricardo Hausmann

Director of the Center for International Development and professor of the Practice of Economic Development, both at Harvard, earned a PhD in economics at Cornell University. In addition to positions with the government of Venezuela, he served as the first chief economist of the Inter-American Development Bank and as chair of the IMF-World Bank Development Committee. His research interests include issues of growth, macroeconomic stability, international finance, and the social dimensions of development. He brings a networks and statistical mechanics perspective to developmental economics.

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Michael Hochberg

External Professor

Distinguished Research Director, Université Montpellier II, Institut des Sciences de l'Evolution (CNRS - UMR 5554)


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Alfred Hübler

External Professor

Director, Center for Complex Systems Research and Professor, Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Alfred W. Hubler received his diplom in 1983 and Ph.D. in 1987, summa cum laude, from the Department of Physics, Technical University of Munich, Germany. After a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Stuttgart, Germany, he came to the University of Illinois as a visiting assistant professor in 1989, and became assistant professor in 1990. Later that year, he also became the associate director of the Center for Complex Systems Research at Illinois, of which he is now the director. Professor Hubler served as a Toshiba Chair Professor at Keio University, Tokyo, in 1993-94. Since beginning his thesis research, Professor Hubler has worked on nonlinear dynamics and has investigated a broad range of nonlinear phenomena. He is primarily a theorist, but he is also experienced in and capable of guiding both experimental and computational work. He has made solid contributions to the study of the chaotic dynamics in classical ...

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Matthew O. Jackson

External Professor

William D. Eberle Professor of Economics, Stanford University, Economics

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Sanjay Jain

External Professor

Professor, University of Delhi, Department of Physics and Astrophysics


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Erica Jen

Science Board, External Professor

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Mark Johnson

External Professor

Director for the Centre for Language Sciences, Macquarie Universtiy, Department of Computing

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My long-range research goal is to scientifically understand cognition and intelligence.My own research has concentrated on human intelligence, because that is where intelligence seems to be most clearly manifested.Further, my research has concentrated on human language.It seems reasonable that of all the domains in which humans demonstrate their intelligence, language provides the richest and most direct reflection of that intelligence.I claim that human language is aconstruction of the human mind to a much greater degree than (say) vision or motor planning are.It's possible that any regularities we find in vision just reflect structure present ...

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Jürgen Jost

External Professor

Director, Max Planck Institute for Mathematics in the Sciences

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Sabre Kais

External Professor

Professor, Purdue University and QEERI, Qatar, Department of Chemistry

Our research is in the field of dimensional scaling, critical phenomena, finite size scaling, quantum phase transitions, and quantum information and computation. In 1989, Prof. Kais received his Ph.D. in Chemical Physics from the Hebrew University. After a postdoctoral appointment at Harvard University 1989-1994, he joined the Chemistry Department at Purdue in 1994 as an Assistant Professor. Since 2002, he has been a full professor of Chemical Physics. He received the National Science Foundation Career Award in 1997. He was also awarded the Purdue University Faculty Scholar Award (2004-2009), and the Guggenheim Fellowship Award (2005). In 2007, Prof. Kais was the Elected Fellow of the American Physical Society and the Elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. In 2012, he received the Sigma Xi Research Award. He has courtesy professorship appointments at both the Department of Computer Science and the Department of Physics at Purdue ...

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Helmut Katzgraber

External Professor

Associate Professor, Texas A & M University, Physics and Astronomy

Helmut Katzgraber was born in Lima, Peru and is Austrian citizen. After growing up in Lima and completing military duties in the Austrian army, he studied physics at ETH Zurich where he graduated with a Diploma with distinction under the supervision of Prof. Gianni Blatter. He received his PhD in Physics in 2001 under the supervision of Prof. A. Peter Young at the University of California Santa Cruz for numerical studies of spin-glass systems. After a one-year postdoctoral position with Profs. Gergely Zimanyi and Richard Scalettar at the University of California Davis where he worked on numerical studies of magnetic recording media, he returned to ETH Zurich in 2002 as a postdoctoral fellow in the group of Prof. Gianni Blatter at the Institute for Theoretical Physics. In 2007 he was awarded a Swiss National Science Foundation professorship and in 2009 he joined TAMU as a tenure-track assistant professor. In 2011 ...

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Tim Kohler

Science Board, External Professor

Regents Professor, Washington State University, Anthropology

Tim received his A.B. from New College of Sarasota, Florida in 1972 and his Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of Florida in 1978. Except for brief interludes in Avignon, Calgary, and Besançon, his academic career to date has been at Washington State University (WSU), Pullman. He directed the Village Ecodynamics NSF Coupled Natural Human Systems project and a joint WSU/University of Washington IGERT called IPEM (IGERT Program in Evolutionary Modeling). He uses agent-based models as aids in calibrating interpretations of what happened in prehistory, with emphasis on the US Southwest, where he is a Research Associate at Crow Canyon Archaeological Center, Cortez, Colorado. Current research areas include paleodemography, human environmental impacts, and social evolution/culture change in Neolithic societies.

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J. Stephen Lansing

External Professor

Director, Nanyang Technological University, Complexity Institute

J. Stephen Lansing resides in Singapore. He is an emeritus professor of anthropology at the University of Arizona, a senior research fellow at the Stockholm Resilience Centre, and president of the Anthropology and Environment Society of the American Anthropological Association. His recent research has to do with adaptive self-organized criticality in coupled social-ecological systems, and co-phylogenies of languages and genes in the islands of Indonesia. In 2012 he developed a UNESCO World Heritage for the subaks and water temple networks of Bali.

Before moving to Arizona in 1998, Lansing held joint appointments at the University of Michigan in the School of Natural Resources & Environment and the Department of Anthropology, and earlier chaired the anthropology department of the University of Southern California. He has been a Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton, the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford, the Institute of Advanced Study ...

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Manfred Laubichler

External Professor

President's Professor, Director, Center for Social Dynamics and Complexity, Arizona State University, School of Life Sciences and Center for Biology and Society


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Fabrizio Lillo

External Professor

Professor of Quantitative Finance, Universita Degli Studi De Palermo, Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa

Fabrizio Lillo is Professor of Quantitative Finance at the Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa (Italy). He is also Assistant Professor of Physics at Palermo University, (Italy, on leave until 2014) and External Professor at the Santa Fe Institute (USA). He received his PhD in Physics from the University of Palermo in 1999 and he has been postdoc (1999-2001) and then researcher of the National Institute of the Physics of Matter (2001-2003). After that he has been postdoc (2003) and member of the External Faculty (2004-2009) of the Santa Fe Institute. He has been awarded the Young Scientist Award for Socio- and Econophysics of the German Physical Society in 2007. He is author of more than 60 referred scientific papers. The ISI papers have received more than 800 citations and his h-index is 16. He has been invited speaker in 20 international conference in the last 5 years. He is also ...

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Marc Lipsitch

External Professor

Director, Center for Communicable Disease Dynamics, Harvard School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology


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Seth Lloyd

Science Board, External Professor

Professor, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

Seth Lloyd is a professor of mechanical engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He refers to himself as a "quantum mechanic". His research area is the interplay of information with complex systems, especially quantum systems

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Jonathan Machta

External Professor

Professor, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Physics

My research is in the area of theoretical condensed matter and statistical physics. My current work is in three areas: simulations of equilibrium critical points, granular gases and applying computational complexity theory to statistical physics.

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Pablo Marquet

External Professor

Professor, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Ecology

The focus of my research program is the emergent discipline of macroecology, understood as that approximation to the study of ecological systems centered in the search for general and invariant principles that underlie their seemingly endless diversity and variability. Because of its synthetic character, research in macroecology is neither restricted to a particular temporal or spatial scale of analysis, nor limited to a particular level of ecological organization, thus encompassing phenomena in both ecological and evolutionary time scales and from local communities to continental and global biotas. What matters is the question and way ecological systems are apprached. The same as in other branches of science, the search for general principles and invariants in complex systems takes the form of statistical regularities such as scaling laws. The aforementioned interests lead me to carry out research on the ecological and evolutionary implications of the body size of organisms in an attempt ...

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Patricia McAnany

External Professor

Kenan Eminent Professor, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, Department of Anthropology

My activities include both archaeological research and collaborative programs with descendant communities in the Maya region. I have come to appreciate that interpreting the past—writing a narrative based upon archaeological evidence (whether from Belize, Yucatán, or elsewhere)—poses great theoretical and methodological challenges as well as daunting responsibilities, the latter particularly in respect to descendant communities. My career has been one of continual engagement with the evolving challenges and responsibilities of archaeology.

Currently, I co-direct the Maya Area Cultural Heritage Initiative (MACHI, www.machiproject.org). This initiative works in collaboration with local Maya communities and NGOs seated within the community to develop programs that emphasize the value of heritage preservation. Heritage is broadly defined as both the tangibles (archaeological landscapes; inherited and inalienable objects) and intangibles (language; spirituality; ritual practice; artistic performance; and learned technologies) of cultural transmission. The goal ...

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Stephan Mertens

External Professor

Professor, Otto-von-Guericke Universität Magdeburg, Institute Für Theoretische Physik


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Lauren Meyers

Science Board, External Professor

Professor and Director, University of Texas at Austin, Section of Integrative Biology and Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology

Dr. Meyers received her B.A. degree in Mathematics and Philosophy in 1996 from Harvard University and her Ph.D. in 2000 from the department of Biological Sciences at Stanford University. After completing a postdoctoral fellowship from the National Science Foundation, she joined the faculty of Integrative Biology at the University of Texas at Austin in 2003. Using a combination of mathematical modeling and experiments, Lauren’s research lies at the interface of evolutionary biology and epidemiology. She studies the interplay between disease transmission dynamics and the evolution of pathogens including those responsible for epidemic meningitis, influenza, walking pneumonia, and SARS. Based on this research, the MIT Technology Review recently named Lauren as one of the top 100 global innovators under age 35.

Dr. Meyers conducts research in two general areas. The first is mathematical epidemiology. Over the last five years, she has been developing new network-based mathematical approaches for ...

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John H. Miller

Chair, Science Steering Committee, External Professor

Professor of Economics and Social Science, Carnegie Mellon University

My research focuses on the complex adaptive behavior that emerges in social systems. The goal of this work is to understand the principles by which aggregate patterns emerge from the simple interactions of individual adaptive agents. The nonlinear and disequilibrium nature of complex adaptive systems often necessitates new methodological and theoretical directions. Methodologically, computational methods provide a convenient tool for modeling such systems. Theoretically, standard analytic tools, based on both linearity and equilibrium behavior, may be ill-tuned to further our understanding of complex systems. Thus, new approaches that emphasize nonlinearities and dynamics are needed.

To understand the behavior of complex adaptive systems, I have relied on the analysis of computational models composed of interacting artificial adaptive agents. The behavior of each agent in the system is dictated by a simple learning algorithm (e.g., genetic algorithm) that allows the agent to adaptively modify its actions from a set of behaviors ...

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Melanie Mitchell

Science Board, External Professor

Professor, Portland State University, Computer Science

Melanie Mitchell is Professor of Computer Science at Portland State University, and External Professor and Member of the Science Board at the Santa Fe Institute. She attended Brown University, where she majored in mathematics and did research in astronomy, and the University of Michigan, where she received a Ph.D. in computer science, Her dissertation, in collaboration with her advisor Douglas Hofstadter, was the development of Copycat, a computer program that makes analogies. She has held faculty or professional positions at the University of Michigan, the Santa Fe Institute, Los Alamos National Laboratory, the OGI School of Science and Engineering, and Portland State University. She is the author or editor of five books and over 70 scholarly papers in in the fields of artificial intelligence, cognitive science, and complex systems. Her most recent book, Complexity: A Guided Tour, published in 2009 by Oxford University Press, is the winner of the ...

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Melanie Moses

External Professor

University of New Mexico, Department of Computer Science


I study complex biological and information systems, the scaling properties of networks, and the general rules governing the acquisition of energy and information in complex adaptive systems. My focus is on the efficiency of growth and information exchange in biological and computational networks, and how the size and topology of networks determine emergent system behavior. I draw insights, tools and approaches from different disciplines in an effort to find unifying principles in the natural world.

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Mark Newman

External Professor

Paul Dirac Collegiate Professor of Physics, University of Michigan, Physics and Complex Systems

Professor Newman's research is on statistical physics and the theory of complex systems, with a primary focus on networked systems, including social, biological, and computer networks, which are studied using a combination of empirical methods, analysis, and computer simulation. Among other topics, he and his collaborators have worked on mathematical models of network structure, computer algorithms for analyzing network data, and applications of network theory to a wide variety of specific problems, including the spread of disease through human populations and the spread of computer viruses among computers, the patterns of collaboration of scientists and business-people, citation networks of scientific articles and law cases, network navigation algorithms and the design of distributed databases, and the robustness of networks to the failure of their nodes.

Professor Newman also has a research interest in cartography and was, along with collaborators, one of the developers of a new type of map projection ...

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Kazuo Nishimura

External Professor

Professor, Kyoto University, Institute of Economic Research, Kyoto University

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Henrik Olsson

External Professor

Associate Professor, University of Warwick, Department of Psychology

Henrik Olsson is a cognitive scientist studying decision making, judgment under uncertainty, social cognition, categorization, and visual perception. A recurrent theme in his research is the development of new psychological theories and the use of formal mathematical models to try to understand the underlying psychological processes. Another theme is the ecological perspective. To understand adaptive behavior, we must consider how the environment, social or physical, is structured and how psychological processes exploit, or fail to exploit, these structures. Henrik’s current work focuses on understanding how properties of individual decision strategies and social network structures affect group performance by connecting research in social cognition and decision making with insights from statistics and machine learning.

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Scott Ortman

External Professor

Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Univeristy of Colorado, Boulder

I am an anthropologist by training who has several related interests. One is the analysis and modeling of coupled natural and human systems over long periods, especially in the U.S. Southwest. Another is historical anthropology, or the integration of historical linguistics, human biology, archaeology, and oral tradition to better-understand the histories of non-literate societies. I am also interested in applications of concepts and methods from cognitive linguistics in historical linguistics and archaeology. Finally, I am interested in the role of political processes in the evolution of human diversity; especially the ways discourse and power interact with material conditions and individual rationality to promote or discourage social transformation.

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John Padgett

External Professor

Professor, University of Chicago, Political Science

John Padgett (Ph.D., Michigan, 1978) is an Associate Professor specializing in American politics, organizational theory, mathematical models, and public policy. He is best known for his models of the federal budget process, although he has written on a variety of topics. The American Journal of Sociology published both his 1993 article "Robust Action and the Rise of the Medici, 1400-1434" and his 1985 essay "The Emergent Organization of Plea Bargaining." He is also an external professor at the Santa Fe Institute. A short biography of John F. Padgett is available from The Bulletin of the Santa Fe Institute. For the past fifteen years, Padgett has been constructing from primary archival sources a massive quantitative data set about social-network evolution over the two hundred years, 1300-1500, in Renaissance Florence. This unprecedented data set contains information on about 50,000 persons: 10,000+ marriages, 14,000+ loans, 3,000+ business partnerships ...

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Scott Page

External Professor

Leonid Hurwicz Collegiate Professor and Director, Center for the Study of Complex Systems, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Political Science and Center for the Study of Complex Systems

Current Positions Collegiate Professor of Complex Systems, Political Science, and Economics, University of Michigan – Ann Arbor Director Center for the Study of Complex Systems Senior Research Scientist Center for Policy Studies Institute for Social Research Director NSF IGERT IDEAS Program External Faculty Member Santa Fe Institute. Education Received a bachelors degree in mathematics from the University of Michigan in 1985, a Masters degree in mathematics from the University of Wisconsin in 1988, and a Masters of Science in business and a Ph. D. in Managerial Economics and Decisions Sciences at Northwestern University (1993). Advisor: Stan Reiter. Committee: Roger Myerson, Mark Satterthwaite, and Matthew Jackson. Previous Employment Scott served as an assistant professor of economics at Caltech from 1993-997. He was a visiting professor of economics at UCLA in 1995, and in 1997, an associate professor of economics at the University of Iowa. In 2000, Scott became an associate professor of ...

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Robert E. Page, Jr.

External Professor

Foundation Chair of Life Sciences and University Provost Emeritus, Arizona State University; Professor Emeritus from the University of California, Davis

Robert E. Page, Jr. is Foundation Chair of Life Sciences and University Provost Emeritus. He was the Vice Provost and Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (2011-2013) and the Founding Director of the School of Life Sciences at Arizona State University (2004-2011). He joined ASU in 2004 after spending 15 years on the faculty of the University of California Davis where he served as Chair of Entomology from 1999-2004. His background is in behavior and population genetics and the focus of his current research is on the evolution of complex social behavior. Using the honey bee as a model, Dr. Page has dissected their complex foraging division of labor at all levels of biological organization from gene networks to complex social interactions. Dr. Page has published more than 230 research papers and articles, 5 books, and is listed as a “highly-cited author” by the ISI Web of ...

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Mark Pagel

Science Board, External Professor

Professor, Reading University, School of Biological Sciences

Mark Pagel is an evolutionary theorist with interests in mathematical and statistical modeling of evolutionary processes. His current interests include language and cultural evolution, networks, regulation, emergence of complex systems, robustness and evolvability, punctuational versus gradual evolutionary change, and evolutionary genomics. His co-authored 1991 monograph on comparative statistical methods in evolutionary biology is standard reading for the field and he is the author of several other statistical methods for identifying and analyzing evolutionary trends and for inferring phylogenetic trees. Some of his recent papers have reported the first evidence for regular punctuational episodes of change at the molecular level associated with speciation events. He has also used statistical methods to reconstruct features of dinosaur genomes, and to infer ancestral features of genes and proteins. Mark has identified simple rules for the assembly of protein interaction networks and speculated on their role in producing robust and evolvable systems. Most recently, he ...

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Mercedes Pascual

Science Board co-chair, Science Steering Committee, External Faculty

Professor, University of Chicago, Department of Ecology and Evolution

I received my Ph.D degree in 1995 from the Joint Program of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. I was awarded a U.S. Department of Energy Alexander Hollaender Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellowship for studies at Princeton, and more recently, a Centennial Fellowship in Global and Complex Systems from the James S. McDonnell Foundation. I am currently affiliated with the Center for the Study of Complex Systems at UM and with the Santa Fe Institute as an external faculty.

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John Pepper

External Professor

Biologist, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Prevention


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Peter Peregrine

External Professor

Professor of Anthropology, Lawrence University


Peregrine’s research focuses on “big questions” of human history: Why did people come to live in cities?  How do coercive leaders maintain their power?  What happens when people from very different cultural and linguistic backgrounds come to live together?  He has pursued answers to these questions in a variety of different ways—from archaeological excavation to complex cross-cultural statistical analyses.  Most recently he has been working with other scholars at the Santa Fe Institute to integrate archaeological, linguistic, and genetic information to understand how modern humans expanded across the earth in the last forty to fifty thousand years and, more specifically, how the diversity of human languages emerged in the last twenty thousand years.

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Alan Perelson

Science Board, External Professor

Senior Fellow, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mathematical and Theoretical Biology

Dr. Perelson received his B.S. degrees in Life Science and Electrical Engineering from MIT in 1967, and a Ph.D. in Biophysics, under the supervision of Aharon Katchalsky-Katzir, from UC Berkeley in 1972. He was Acting Assistant Professor, Division of Medical Physics, Berkeley, in 1973 and a postdoctoral fellow at the Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Minnesota, in 1974. He was a staff member in the Theoretical Biology and Biophysics Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory from 1974 - 1991, a Laboratory Fellow from 1991 - 2002, head of the Theoretical Biology and Biophysics Group between 1995 - 2001, and is currently a Los Alamos National Laboratory Senior Fellow. He spent the 1978 and 1979 academic years at Brown University as an Assistant Professor of Medical Sciences in the Division of Biology and Medicine and the Lefschetz Center for Dynamical Systems, was a visiting scientist at the Mathematical Institute, Oxford University ...

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Juan Perez-Mercader

External Professor

Senior Research Fellow and Principal Investigator, Harvard University, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences

Juan Pérez-Mercader earned his Ph.D. from the City College of New York. He is an Elected Member of the International Academy of Astronautics and of the European Academy of Arts and Sciences. In 1998 in Association with the NASA Astrobiology Institute, he founded Spain's Centro de Astrobiología (CAB) of which he was its first Director. He is the architect of Spain's current participation with infrastructure and instrumentation on board Mars Science Laboratory that arrived on Mars in August 2012. He is Profesor de Investigación in Spain's National Research Council (CSIC) and an External Faculty at the Santa Fe Institute. In 2010, he joined Harvard as a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences and the university's Origins of Life Initiative, where he leads a project on the "Top-down Synthesis of an Ex-novo Chemical Artificial Living System".

Research Interests: Physics of Self-organizing ...

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Ole Peters

External Professor

London Mathematical Laboratory

I'm a physicist specializing in statistical mechanics. Since 2007 I have spent an increasing amount of my time working on applications of stochastic processes to risk management and, very broadly, investment decisions under uncertainty. Here, I am most interested in fundamental concepts whose consequences have not been fully explored. In particular, the significance of time-irreversibility, non-ergodicity, and non-stationarity often seems to be underestimated, and their effects are added as corrections rather than viewed as fundamental.

More generally, my work has been concerned with highly susceptible, globally correlated systems. The simplest examples are mathematical models with continuous phase transitions. I have worked on theories developed in the context of these models and have applied them to real-world systems, such as earth's atmosphere. The findings of our theoretically motivated empirical studies are now being used to improve climate models.

Links to SFI working papers and other publications can be found ...

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Thomas "Zack" Powell

Trained initially as a particle physicist, Thomas M. (Zack) Powell has been a practicing oceanographer and aquatic ecologist for more than forty-five years, working in lakes, estuaries, and the ocean. His studies have been directed toward the question: how do physical processes, like mixing and turbulence, currents and circulation, or mass and energy transfer at the surface, affect the biological processes in planktonic ecosystems? Many of Powell’s investigations have addressed this question with field measurements in environments including nearshore/intertidal systems, the California Current, and estuaries like the San Francisco Bay. In addition, with approaches that do not involve ocean data collection directly, Powell studies (or has recently studied) the impact of climate and the construction of mathematical, statistical, and numerical models of coupled physical transport and ecological interactions.

Prof. Powell has provided leadership at the University of California, and for national and international scientific endeavors. For example, at UC Berkeley he chaired the interdisciplinary Energy and Resources Group (ERG) and the Department of Integrative Biology. In addition, for six years he was Chair of the Scientific Steering Committee for U.S. GLOBEC (a project within the U.S. Global Change Research Program addressing the effect of global climate change on ocean ecosystems). Powell has been a visiting scholar at five universities — Oxford, Washington (Seattle), North Carolina, Cornell, and Hawaii — and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Sciences, and the California Academy of Sciences.

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Steen Rasmussen

External Professor

Professor, Research Director and Center Leader, University of Southern Denmark, Self Organizing Systems

Born July 7, 1955 in Helsingoer (Elsinore), Denmark. Citizen of Denmark. Permanent Residence in U.S.A. (Alien of Extraordinary Ability). Formal education, PhD Physics. Focused on representing, generating, analyzing, and controling self-organizing and related systemic processes as they are manifested in natural and human-made systems. Current and recent projects include assembly of protocells, web-based decision support systems, simulation of critical infrastructure protection, and the development of simple urban dynamics simulations.

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Dan Rockmore

External Professor, Science Steering Committee

Professor, Dartmouth College, Mathematics and Computer Science

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John Rundle

External Professor

Distinguished Professor of Physics and Geology, University of California, Davis, Earth and Planetary Sciences

Professor John Rundle joined the UCD faculty in 2002. His research is concerned with the dynamics of complex systems, for the most part in the geosciences. For over thirty years, his research has focused on using statistical physics to understand the physics of earthquakes and other driven threshold systems. Mathematically, these systems are characterized by phase transitions, both first (nucleation) and second order types. The dynamics of these systems can be understood by the use of field theories developed in other areas of physics, including particle physics and cosmology.

Professor Rundle has a particular interest in the development of methods for earthquake forecasting based on studies of chaos and complexity in driven nonlinear systems, as well as on the use of realistic, large scale numerical simulations. More recently, he has developed an interest in viewing crashes in economic and financial systems as a kind of .Econoquake. that might be understood ...

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Jeremy (Jerry) A. Sabloff

External Professor and Past President, Santa Fe Institute

JEREMY ARAC SABLOFF (B.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1964; Ph.D., Harvard University, 1969) is an External Professor of the Santa Fe Institute and past President of the Institute (2009-2015). He also is Christopher H. Browne Distinguished Professor of Anthropology Emeritus of the University of Pennsylvania. Before coming to the Santa Fe Institute, he taught at Harvard University, the University of Utah, the University of New Mexico (where he was Chair of the Department), the University of Pittsburgh (where he also was Chair), and the University of Pennsylvania (where he was the Williams Director of the University of Pennsylvania Museum from 1994-2004 ). He also was an Overseas Visiting Fellow at St. John's College, Cambridge, England.

He is a past President of the Society for American Archaeology, a past Chair of Section H (Anthropology) of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and past Editor of American Antiquity. He ...

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Paula L.W. Sabloff

External Professor, Santa Fe Institute

Click HERE to download maps from my book, 'Mapping Mongolia: Situating Mongolia in the World from Geologic Time to the Present'.

Paula Sabloff, External Professor, holds a B.A. from Vassar College and an M.A. and Ph.D. from Brandeis University, with a year at the University of Pennsylvania in-between. A political anthropologist, she is applying network analysis to four databases in order to re-conceptualize democracy in Mongolia, recreating society in Mexico, and the emergence of early states all over the world.

Sabloff continues her work on Mongolians’ changing ideas of democracy and capitalism as they abandon socialism and adapt to democracy and capitalism. She has conducted fieldwork and interviews in the summers from1996 to 2003. She curated an exhibition, “Modern Mongolia: Reclaiming Genghis Khan,” which spent five months at the National Museum of Natural History (Smithsonian) in 2002 among other venues. An edited volume by that name is ...

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Van P. Savage

External Professor

Associate Professor, Department of Biomathematics and the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, UCLA School of Medicine

I want to use mathematical models to understand how diversity is organized, constrained, and controlled in biological systems. My models are constructed using fractal and asymmetric branching networks along with ordinary, partial, and stochastic differential equations. I analyze these models using asymptotic methods, optimization theory, dynamical systems methods, and numerical methods. I test the predictions of these models by performing statistical analyses on large empirical data sets obtained by my collaborators or compiled from the literature. I would contribute to the department by using and teaching a variety of mathematical methods and by bringing to the department my diverse experience constructing quantitative models from conceptual ideas, a suite methods for analyzing large empirical and comparative data sets, and a fresh perspective on many scientific and other applied problems.

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Hans Joachim (John) Schellnhuber

External Professor

Director, Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research


Born in 1950 in Ortenburg (Germany). Training in physics and mathematics with a scholarship for the exceptionally gifted at Regensburg University. Doctorate in Theoretical Physics in 1980. Various periods of research abroad, in particular at several institutions of the University of California system (USA). Habilitation (German qualification for professorial status) in 1985, then Heisenberg Fellowship. 1989 Full Professor at the Interdisciplinary Centre for Marine and Environmental Sciences (ICBM) of Oldenburg University, later Director of the ICBM.

1991 Founding Director of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK); since 1993 Director of PIK and Professor for Theoretical Physics at Potsdam University. 2001-2005 additional engagement as Research Director of the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research and Professor at the Environmental Sciences School of the University of East Anglia in Norwich (UK). From 2005 - 2009 Visiting Professor in Physics and Visiting Fellow of Christ Church College at Oxford University as well ...

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Peter Schuster

External Professor Emeritus

Professor emeritus, University of Vienna, Theoretical Chemistry

Born March 07, 1941 in Vienna, Austria. Ph.D. (chemistry and physics with honors), University of Vienna, 1967. Postdoctoral Fellow, Max-Planck-Institute for Physical Chemistry, Göttingen, 1968-1970. ‘Habilitation’ in Theoretical Chemistry, 1971. Positions and affiliations: Professor of Theoretical Chemistry, University of Vienna, 1973-2009; Professor emeritus 2009 –, Head of the Institute of Theoretical Chemistry, 1973-1991 and 1996-2010. External Faculty Member of the Santa Fe Institute, Santa Fe (NM), 1991-2003 and 2004-. Founding Director of the Institute of Molecular Biotechnology, Jena (Germany), 1991-1995. Memberships (selected): Austrian Academy of Sciences (Fellow 1984, Vice President 2000-2003, President 2006-2009), Deutsche Akademie der Naturforscher Leopoldina (Fellow 1993, Member of the Presidium 2001-2006), National Academy of Sciences, USA (Foreign Associate 2009), Academia Europaea London (Fellow 2009). Peter Schuster’s early work deals with the theory and structural properties of intermolecular complexes presenting computational evidence for different geometries of normal, strong, and solid state hydrogen bonds. Merging chemical reaction ...

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Rajiv Sethi

External Professor

Ann Whitney Olin Professor of Economics, Barnard College, Columbia University, Dept. of Economics

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Cosma Shalizi

External Professor

Assistant Professor, Carnegie Mellon University, Statistics Department

Most of my work involves stochastic aspects of nonlinear dynamical systems, unsupervised machine learning, or some combination of the two; almost all of it uses information theory, which I find to be an invaluable tool for proving probabilistic results.

My original training is in the statistical physics of complex systems — high-dimensional systems where the variables are strongly interdependent, but cannot be effectively resolved into a single low-dimensional subspace. I was (and am) particularly fond of the method of symbolic dynamics, and of cellular automata, which are spatial stochastic processes modeling pattern formation, fluid flow, magnetism and distributed computation, among other things. Much of my earlier work involves complexity measures, like thermodynamic depth, and, even more, the Grassberger-Crutchfield-Young "statistical complexity", the minimal amount of information about the past of a system required for optimal prediction of its future. This notion is intimately related to that of a minimal predictively-sufficient ...

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David Sherrington

External Professor

University of Oxford, Condensed Matter Theory Group; The Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics


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Martin Shubik

External Professor Emeritus

Seymour Knox Professor of Mathematical Institutional Economics, Yale University, Economics

Dr. Martin Shubik is currently the Seymour H. Knox Professor of Mathematical Institutional Economics at Yale University. The title indicates an interest in the underlying abstractions of mathematical economics combined with a stress on understanding actual institutions and processes. He received his B.A. and M.S. degrees in Mathematics and Political Economy from the University of Toronto, Ontario, Canadian 1947 and 1949 respectively. He received his A.M. and Ph.D degrees in Economics from Princeton University in 1951 and 1953 respectively. His main academic concerns are with the theory of money and financial institutions (how and why they are created and destroyed--and their social purpose) the theory of games and its relationship to strategic behavior and a third and somewhat different interest is in the management and economics of cultural institutions. He is the author of approximately twenty books and over 200 articles and specializes primarily in strategic ...

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D. Eric Smith

D. Eric Smith received the Bachelor of Science in Physics and Mathematics from the California Institute of Technology in 1987, and a Ph.D. in Physics from The University of Texas at Austin in 1993, with a dissertation on problems in string theory and high-temperature superconductivity. From 1993 to 2000 he worked in physical, nonlinear, and statistical acoustics at the Applied Research Labs: U. T. Austin, and at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. From 2000 through 2011 he worked at the Santa Fe Institute on problems of self-organization in thermal, chemical, and biological systems. A focus of his current work is the statistical mechanics of the transition from the geochemistry of the early earth to the first levels of biological organization, with some emphasis on the emergence of the metabolic network.

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Bruce Smith

External Professor

Curator, North American Archaeology, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution

Bruce D. Smith has been a Curator of North American Archaeology in the Department of Anthropology, NMNH, since 1978. His primary geographical area of interest is eastern North America, and his general research interests have centered on human-environmental interaction.

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Ricard Solé

External Professor

ICREA-Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Life Sciences

I am ICREA research professor (the Catalan Institute for research and Advanced Studies). I am now at the Universitat Pompeu Fabra , where I'm the head of the COMPLEX SYSTEMS LAB. Since 1997, I am External Professor of the Santa Fe Institute (New Mexico, USA), a great place to do research in a truly interdisciplinary environment, full of smart people. I am also member of the Council of the European Complex Systems Society. I am member of the editorial board of several international peer reviewed journals. I completed a five-year degree in Physics and another 5-year degree in Biology at the University of Barcelona and received my PhD in Physics in the Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya.
One of my main research interests is understanding the possible presence of universal patterns of organization in complex systems, from prebiotic replicators to evolved artificial objects. Key questions are how robust structures develop, how ...

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Peter Stadler

External Professor

Professor, University of Leipzig, Dept. of Computer Science & Interdisciplinary Center of Bioinformatics

http://www.bioinf.uni-leipzig.de/~studla/cv.html

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Charles Stanish

External Professor, Science Steering Committee

Professor and Director, University of California, Los Angeles, Anthropology, Cotsen Institute of Archeology

Charles Stanish is Director of the Cotsen Institute of Archaeology and Professor of Anthropology at UCLA. He has worked extensively in Peru, Bolivia, and Chile, conducting archaeological research on the prehistoric societies of the region. His theoretical work focuses on the roles that trade, war, and labor organization play in the evolution of human cooperation and complex societies. His books include Lake Titicaca: Legend, Myth, and Science (2011), Ancient Titicaca: The Evolution of Complex Society in Southern Peru and Northern Bolivia (2003), Ritual and Pilgrimage in the Ancient Andes (with B. Bauer, 2001) and Ancient Andean Political Economy (1992). He also works with a sustainable development group to preserve global cultural heritage through a combination of micro-lending, direct community grants, and tourist infrastructure development. He was a Senior Fellow at Dumbarton Oaks Research Library, is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and is a member of ...

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Charles Stevens

External Professor, Science Board

Professor and Vincent J. Coates Chair in Molecular Neurobiology, The Salk Institute, Molecular Neurobiology Laboratory

I received my BA in Psychology from Harvard, my MD from Yale, and my PhD in Biophysics from Rockefeller University where I studied mathematics and physics and did experimental research in vision. My long-term goal is to understand the mathematical operations carried out by neural circuits, and my immediate goal is to understand the design principles that underlie the scalable architecture of neural circuits. The immediate goal relates to the long-term goal through the fact that circuit scalability together with the properties of neurons places constraints on the types of operations that the circuit can carry out. The current research program uses quantitative neuroanatomical and physiological data from brain regions in fish to study scalability. Fish are used because they continue to grow throughout their live, to add new neurons to their brain and retina, and to increase the size and capability of their neural circuits. Design principles identified in ...

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Stefan Thurner

External Professor

Head, Section for Science of Complex Systems, Medical University of Vienna

Stefan Thurner is full professor for Science of Complex Systems at the Medical University of Vienna, where he founded the Complex Systems Research Group (now Section for Science of Complex Systems) in 2003. Since 2007 he is external professor at the Santa Fe institute.

After his PhD in theoretical physics at the Technical University of Vienna in 1995 he held postdoc research positions at Humboldt Universität zu Berlin and Boston University before he joined the University of Vienna in 1999 and later Medical University. In 2001 he got a second PhD in economics at the University of Vienna and his Habilitation in theoretical physics. About this time - strongly influenced by visits to the Santa Fe Institute - he began to shift his focus from theoretical physics to biological and complex systems, which are now his main areas of scientific work.

Since 1995 Thurner has published more than 120 scientific articles in ...

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Jessika Trancik

External Professor, Science Steering Committee

Atlantic Richfield Career Development Assistant Professor in Energy Studies, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Engineering Systems Division

My research focuses on the evolution of technologies and on decomposing performance trajectories of energy systems. I am particularly interested in understanding the dynamics and limits of costs and carbon intensities of energy technologies, in order to inform climate change mitigation efforts. A subset of projects centers on nanostructured energy technologies and their potential to reach very low costs and carbon intensities. I received my B.S. in materials science and engineering from Cornell University and my Ph.D. in materials science from the University of Oxford, where I studied as a Rhodes Scholar. I have also worked for the United Nations, and as an advisor to the private sector on investment in low-carbon energy technologies.

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Constantino Tsallis

External Professor

Brazilian Center for Physics Research and National Institute of Science and Tech

Professor Constantino Tsallis is a physicist in the area of statistical mechanics, head of the Department of Theoretical Physics of the Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, in Rio de Janeiro (Ministry of Science and Technology of Brazil), and also head of the National Institute of Science and Technology for Complex Systems of Brazil. He obtained his title of Docteur d´ État ès Sciences Physiques from the University of Paris-France in 1974. He has worked in a variety of theoretical subjects in the areas of critical phenomena, chaos and nonlinear dynamics, economics, cognitive psychology, immunology, population evolution, among others. Since two decades, he is focusing on the entropy and the foundations of statistical mechanics, as well as on some of their scientific and technological applications. Indeed, he proposed in 1988 a generalization of Boltzmann-Gibbs entropy and statistical mechanics. This generalization is presently being actively studied around the world: a Bibliography containing ...

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Sander van der Leeuw

External Professor

Foundation Professor, Arizona State University, School of Sustainability and Schoolof Human Evolution and Social Change

An archaeologist and historian by training, after teaching appointments at Leyden, Amsterdam, Cambridge (UK) and Paris (Panthéon-Sorbonne) he presently holds the Chair of Anthropology at Arizona State University in the USA. He is an External Faculty Member of the Santa Fe Institute, a Correspondent of the Royal Dutch Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a Member of the Institut Universitaire de France. His research interests have been in archaeological theory, reconstruction of ancient ceramic technologies, regional archaeology, (ancient and modern) man-land relationships, GIS and modelling, and Complex Systems Theory. He did archaeological fieldwork in Syria, Holland and France, and conducted ethno-archaeological studies in the Near East, the Philippines and Mexico. He has held visiting positions at the the University of Michigan, the University of Reading (UK), Australian National University, the University of Massachussetts at Amherst, and the Arizona State University, as well as at the Santa Fe Institute, and has ...

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Andreas Wagner

Science Board, External Professor

Professor, University of Zurich, Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environ. Studies

Andreas Wagner is professor in the institute of evolutionary biology and environmental studies at the University of Zurich in Switzerland, and External Professor at SFI. His main research interests are the evolution of biological systems, from genomes to complex molecular networks. Wagner is the author of more than 100 scientific publications and two scientific monographs, /Robustness and Evolvability/ /in Living Systems/ (Princeton University Press, 2005), and /The/ /Origins of Evolutionary Innovations/ (Oxford University Press, 2011), which puts forth a comprehensive theory of innovation in living systems. His popular science book /Paradoxical Life/ won the gold medal for best science book in the 2010 Association of Independent Publishers Book Awards. Wagner received his Ph.D in 1995 at Yale University, where his research won the J.S. Nicholas prize for best dissertation in his field. He has lectured widely worldwide, and held research fellowships at several institutions, such as the Institute ...

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Douglas R. White

External Professor

Professor Emeritus, Anthropology, University of California-Irvine, Institute of Mathematical Behavioral Science

Doug White, PhD Minnesota, 1969, and born in 1942 in Minneapolis, is a social anthropologist and complexity researcher whose work includes mathematical modeling, network analysis, and simulation in sociology and economics. His fields of study include political economic and social networks, ethnohistorical sociology, comparative and long-term ethnographic studies, global political history, and the role of cohesive marriage and kinship networks in larger sociopolitical systems. Partly schooled as an exchange student in Madrid, he did graduate school as a Traveling Scholar on a National Institute of Mental Health predoctoral Fellowship at Columbia, Minnesota, and Michigan. Having worked extensively in Europe, his long-term awards include the Alexander von Humboldt Distinguished Senior Scientist in Germany, the Ministry of Research bourse in Paris, and research directorships in the Irish Republic Ministries of Finance and the Gaeltacht. He teaches at the University of California, Irvine ...

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Jon Wilkins

External Professor

Ronin Institute

My interests are in evolutionary theory, broadly defined. My prior work has focused on coalescent theory and genomic imprinting. My current research has continued in those areas, and has expanded into areas like human language and demographic history, altruism, cultural evolution, and statistical inference.

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Chris Wood

External Professor

Chris received his Ph.D. from Yale University in 1973. Following a postdoctoral appointment at Walter Reed Army Institute of Research in Washington DC, he returned to Yale as a faculty member with joint appointments in the Departments of Psychology, Neurology, and Neurosurgery. Chris left Yale in 1989 to lead the Biophysics Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory, a position he held until becoming the Santa Fe Institute's Vice President in 2005. At Los Alamos, Chris' group was responsible for a wide range of biophysical and physical research, including protein crystallography, quantum information, and human brain imaging. During 2000-2001, Chris served as interim director of the National Foundation for Functional Brain Imaging, a collaboration involving Harvard / Massachusetts General Hospital, University of Minnesota, and a number of academic and research institutions in New Mexico devoted to the development and application of advanced functional imaging techniques to mental disorders. Chris' research ...

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Elisabeth Jean Wood

External Professor

Professor, Yale University, Political Science

Elisabeth Jean Wood is Professor of Political Science at Yale University and Professor of the Santa Fe Institute. She is currently writing a book on variation in sexual violence during war. She is the author of Forging Democracy from Below: Insurgent Transitions in South Africa and El Salvador (Cambridge University Press, 2000) and Insurgent Collective Action and Civil War in El Salvador (Cambridge University Press, 2003). Among her recent articles are “Sexual Violence during War: Toward an Understanding of Variation,” (in Order, Conflict, and Violence (Cambridge University Press, 2008), “Armed groups and sexual violence: when is wartime rape rare?” (Politics and Society, 2009), and “The Social Processes of Civil War”, (Annual Review of Political Science, 2008).She serves on the editorial boards of Politics and Society, The American Political Science Review, and the Contentious Politics series of Cambridge University Press. At Yale Elisabeth teachers courses on comparative politics, political violence ...

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William (Woody) Woodruff

External Professor

Laboratory Fellow, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Chemistry Division

My research interests are biophysics and photophysics; bioenergetics and molecular energy transduction; energy-based scaling relationships in biological, ecologicial, and socioeconomic systems.

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Henry T. Wright

External Professor

Albert C. Spaulding Distinguished University Professor of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology

Henry T. Wright is Professor of Anthropology at the Department of Anthropology and Curator of Near Eastern Archaeology at the Museum of Anthropological Archaeology. His earliest archaeological research was on the shores of the Chesapeake Bay and in the Appalachians, recording the remains of prehistoric camp and village sites, and learning to view the past in regional and ecological perspectives. He came to the University of Michigan as an undergraduate, and worked for the Museum of Anthropology on prehistoric archeological sites in the Midwest and in France. At the University of Chicago, he was introduced to the ancient Near East, the planet's earliest civilization by Robert Adams. He researched Early Urban systems in southern Iraq for his Ph.D. dissertation and returned to Ann Arbor to join the staff at the Museum of Anthropology as it was being transformed from a program concerned largely with North America into an ...

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Melinda A. Zeder

Zeder’s research interests include the domestication of animals, the social and environmental implications of early agriculture in the ancient Near East, and the development of specialized subsistence economies in early complex societies. She is also interested in the intersection of archaeology and genetics in documenting the domestication of plant and animal species. She has worked in Iran, Israel, Turkey, and most recently in Syria.

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